Monday, May 29, 2017

Bruce Hornsby & the Noisemakers at City Winery

Bruce Hornsby was born in Williamsburg, Virginia, and in 1974 first performed in his older brother's band, Bobby Hi-Test & the Octane Kids, playing covers of jam band songs. In 1980, Bruce and his younger brother, John Hornsby, moved to Los Angeles, California, where they spent three years writing songs; while there, Bruce was a session musician and performed in Sheena Easton's band. Back in Virginia in 1984, he formed Bruce Hornsby & the Range and, largely due to the multi-platinum hit "The Way It Is," won the Grammy Award for Best New Artist in 1987. In 1990, Hornsby began collaborating with the Grateful Dead and later with many of its offshoots. His own music became more improvisational, leading to the demise of his pop band in 1991. Beginning in 1993, Hornsby's solo work became more diversified, as he recorded bluegrass, classical and jazz albums. In 1998, a new band, Bruce Hornsby & the Noisemakers, incorporated all of those sounds. The Noisemakers presently consist of  keyboardist/organist John “JT” Thomas, bassist J.V. Collier, drummer Sonny Emory, fiddle/mandolin player Ross Holmes, and guitarist Gibb Droll. Bruce Hornsby & the Noisemakers' sixth and most recent album, Rehab Reunion, was released on June 17, 2016.

At City Winery tonight, the first of three shows, Bruce Hornsby & the Noisemakers played songs loosely and freely jammed in a wide spectrum, including elements of classical, jazz, bluegrass, folk, rock, blues, and jam band musical traditions. Hornsby proved to be a hefty player on the piano and other instruments, but he was also a grand bandleader, encouraging his musicians to showcase their skills. The show even began with a drum solo before segueing into the opening song, "Barren Ground." From there, Hornsby and his band solidly cascaded into medleys that featured spacious musical arrangements and freewheeling musical exchanges. About midpoint in the concert, Hornsby moved away from his piano and play a dulcimer in an acoustic four-song mini-set with the band, and Hornsby played accordion on another song later in the performance. Hornsby's vocals were under par this evening, however, carrying the words and melodies but cracking often. Nevertheless, the strength of Hornsby's performance was in his ability to capture lively pop with bits from classical compositions, jazz standards, and traditional bluegrass.

Visit Bruce Hornsby at www.BruceHornsby.com.

Setlist
  1. Sonny Emory drum solo > Barren Ground
  2. Leadbelly cover > Country Doctor
  3. Simple Prayer > Simple Prayer Part Two
  4. The Red Plains
  5. John “JT” Thomas organ solo > The Way It Is
  6. Funhouse
  7. Green Green Rocky Road*
  8. Black Rats of London*
  9. MIA in M.I.A.M.I.*
  10. Over the Rise*
  11. End of the Innocence
  12. Ross Holmes fiddle solo > Big Stick**
  13. Fortunate Son
  14. Rainbow’s Cadillac

* denotes Hornsby on dulcimer; ** Hornsby on accordion

Encore
  1. Place Under the Sun

Sunday, May 28, 2017

Imminent Sonic Destruction at Dröm

Pete Thompson & Tony Piccoli
Vocalist/guitarist Tony Piccoli formed a progressive metal band called Mellotrön in 2007 in Detroit, Michigan. Due to legal matters the band was renamed Imminent Sonic Destruction in 2011. Imminent Sonic Destruction released a debut CD in 2012 and toured North America opening for Pain of Salvation and Fates Warning, and later with Circus Maximus in 2016. Imminent Sonic Destruction's second and most recent CD, Triumphia, is a concept album featuring over 69 minutes of music. Triumphia was released on September 2, 2016. Imminent Sonic Destruction consists of Piccoli, guitarist Scott Thompson, keyboardist Pete Hopersberger, bassist Bryan Paxton, and drummer Pat DeLeon.

Closing a tour with Edensong tonight at Dröm, Imminent Sonic Destruction performed songs that utilized both complex progressive rock structures and the hard, crushing riffs of a metal band. It was a thinker's band, with imagery provided through Piccoli's pensive words and angst-driven delivery. The music moved from peaceful to churning, and from steady four/four to odd syncopations, fearlessly balancing the songs with soothing and brutal extremes. Vocal harmonies led to epic-sounding yet melodic grooves. Imminent Sonic Destruction is a band to watch on the progressive metal horizon.

Visit Imminent Sonic Destruction at www.imminentsonicdestruction.com.

Saturday, May 27, 2017

Max's Kansas City Festival 2017 at the Bowery Electric/Day 3

In the early 1960s, New Jersey-born Mickey Ruskin walked away from a career as a lawyer for a more speculative life as a restaurant and bar owner in New York City. After some success with other ventures, he opened Max's Kansas City in 1965 as a restaurant and late night gathering spot catering particularly to artists, poets and musicians. At first the restaurant became known in art circles for its display of paintings and sculptures and for its bowls of uncooked chick peas on the tables. Soon, it became known as the hangout for Andy Warhol, whose workplace, the Factory, was nearby, and his colorful crew. The second floor became known as a music venue when the Velvet Underground performed there almost every night during the summer of 1970. Afterwards, it became a premiere venue for burgeoning rock acts like Bruce Springsteen, Aerosmith, Bob Marley & the Wailers, Bonnie Raitt, Tom Waits, Gram Parsons and countless others, until unresolved tax issues forced Ruskin to close all operations in 1974. Ruskin died from a drug overdose in 1983 at the age of 50.

Tommy Dean Mills reopened the club in 1975, by which time the art folks were replaced by the new punks. Mills hired Peter Crowley to book the shows, and the club competed with CBGB's, which had opened in 1973 and paved the punk rock scene. Major punk bands performed at Max's Kansas City, including the Runaways and the Damned. After the breakup of the Sex Pistols, Sid Vicious gravitated to Max's and played all of his US solo gigs there. Devo played several shows at Max's in 1977, including a show where they were introduced by David Bowie as "the band of the future." Local bands were the regular fare, however. Max's closed again in November 1981; Bad Brains were the headliners on the final night, with the Beastie Boys opening.

Peter Crowley has booked Max's Kansas City reunions in 2010, 2012, 2015 and 2017. For the most recent series, May 25-27, Crowley booked about 35 bands at the Bowery Electric. The larger basement room primarily hosted bands that Crowley booked at Max's. The bands that played the smaller street level room, the Map Room, by and large were newer bands that were inspired by 1970s rock and roll.

Saturday, May 27
Main Room
Mickey Leigh Band
Phil Marcade
The Rousers
Deborah Frost
Sea Monster
King Bee & the Stingers

The Map Room
Avant Duel with VON LMO & Otto von Ruggins
Density
Dragon People with Walter Steding
Zaingrea
Peter Crowley
Walter Steding
Deborah Frost
The Rousers
Phil Marcade
Mickey Leigh
VON LMO & Otto von Ruggins

The Undead at Tompkins Square Park

Bobby Steele and his wife, Diana Steele
Bobby Steele was born in Teaneck, New Jersey, spent part of his youth in New Milford, New Jersey, and was the guitarist for Parrotox, Slash & the Whorelords, and the Skabs before joining the horror-punk Misfits from 1978 to 1980. In 1980, parting from the Misfits and living in New York City, Steele reformed the Skabs, which quickly became the Undead. Over the years, Steele also has played with Sloppy Seconds, Times Square, the Migraines, the Zero Prophets, the Graveyard School and other local punk bands. The Undead's eighth and most recent studio album is 2015's The Morgue... The Merrier; the band is working on a new EP, Having an Undead Summer. The Undead presently consists of vocalist/guitarist Bobby Steele, keyboardist/guitarist Diana Steele, bassist Jason Fresta and drummer Joe Stoker.

The Shadow, a local underground newspaper, hosted its annual Memorial Day weekend concert in Tompkins Square Park, and the Undead was the headliner once again. While a touch of horror was intrinsic to the band's look and Steele's songwriting, what the public witnessed in the park today was largely old-fashioned guitar-driven rock and roll performed with faster, rougher power. Performed at frenetic speed, the energetic set compromised nothing. It was as pure and basic as three-chord punk rock can be. While countless musicians can claim membership in the Undead at some time, the band's original sound remained as integral as ever with the new lineup. This music was not only what the Undead do best, it is the only thing the band has ever done or ever been. There was an admirable and blatant honesty in the Undead's set that could not be challenged.

Visit the Undead at www.theundead.com.

Friday, May 26, 2017

Max's Kansas City Festival 2017 at the Bowery Electric/Day 2

In the early 1960s, New Jersey-born Mickey Ruskin walked away from a career as a lawyer for a more speculative life as a restaurant and bar owner in New York City. After some success with other ventures, he opened Max's Kansas City in 1965 as a restaurant and late night gathering spot catering particularly to artists, poets and musicians. At first the restaurant became known in art circles for its display of paintings and sculptures and for its bowls of uncooked chick peas on the tables. Soon, it became known as the hangout for Andy Warhol, whose workplace, the Factory, was nearby, and his colorful crew. The second floor became known as a music venue when the Velvet Underground performed there almost every night during the summer of 1970. Afterwards, it became a premiere venue for burgeoning rock acts like Bruce Springsteen, Aerosmith, Bob Marley & the Wailers, Bonnie Raitt, Tom Waits, Gram Parsons and countless others, until unresolved tax issues forced Ruskin to close all operations in 1974. Ruskin died from a drug overdose in 1983 at the age of 50.

Tommy Dean Mills reopened the club in 1975, by which time the art folks were replaced by the new punks. Mills hired Peter Crowley to book the shows, and the club competed with CBGB's, which had opened in 1973 and paved the punk rock scene. Major punk bands performed at Max's Kansas City, including the Runaways and the Damned. After the breakup of the Sex Pistols, Sid Vicious gravitated to Max's and played all of his US solo gigs there. Devo played several shows at Max's in 1977, including a show where they were introduced by David Bowie as "the band of the future." Local bands were the regular fare, however. Max's closed again in November 1981; Bad Brains were the headliners on the final night, with the Beastie Boys opening.

Peter Crowley has booked Max's Kansas City reunions in 2010, 2012, 2015 and 2017. For the most recent series, May 25-27, Crowley booked about 35 bands at the Bowery Electric. The larger basement room primarily hosted bands that Crowley booked at Max's. The bands that played the smaller street level room, the Map Room, by and large were newer bands that were inspired by 1970s rock and roll.

Friday, May 26
Main Room
Reagan Youth
The Brats
Tammy Faye Starlight as Nico
Ruby & the Rednecks
The Magic Tramps
Simon Chardiet

The Map Room
Frankie & the Street Angels
Stumblebunny
Val Kinzler Band

Sex Dolls
Peter Crowley
Val Kinzler
Ruby & the Rednecks
Stumblebunny
Tammy Faye Starlite as Nico
Frankie Rage of Frankie & the Street Angels
Keith West of the Brats
Reagan Youth

Thursday, May 25, 2017

Max's Kansas City Festival 2017 at the Bowery Electric/Day 1

In the early 1960s, New Jersey-born Mickey Ruskin walked away from a career as a lawyer for a more speculative life as a restaurant and bar owner in New York City. After some success with other ventures, he opened Max's Kansas City in 1965 as a restaurant and late night gathering spot catering particularly to artists, poets and musicians. At first the restaurant became known in art circles for its display of paintings and sculptures and for its bowls of uncooked chick peas on the tables. Soon, it became known as the hangout for Andy Warhol, whose workplace, the Factory, was nearby, and his colorful crew. The second floor became known as a music venue when the Velvet Underground performed there almost every night during the summer of 1970. Afterwards, it became a premiere venue for burgeoning rock acts like Bruce Springsteen, Aerosmith, Bob Marley & the Wailers, Bonnie Raitt, Tom Waits, Gram Parsons and countless others, until unresolved tax issues forced Ruskin to close all operations in 1974. Ruskin died from a drug overdose in 1983 at the age of 50.

Tommy Dean Mills reopened the club in 1975, by which time the art folks were replaced by the new punks. Mills hired Peter Crowley to book the shows, and the club competed with CBGB's, which had opened in 1973 and paved the punk rock scene. Major punk bands performed at Max's Kansas City, including the Runaways and the Damned. After the breakup of the Sex Pistols, Sid Vicious gravitated to Max's and played all of his US solo gigs there. Devo played several shows at Max's in 1977, including a show where they were introduced by David Bowie as "the band of the future." Local bands were the regular fare, however. Max's closed again in November 1981; Bad Brains were the headliners on the final night, with the Beastie Boys opening.

Peter Crowley has booked Max's Kansas City reunions in 2010, 2012, 2015 and 2017. For the most recent series, May 25-27, Crowley booked about 35 bands at the Bowery Electric. The larger basement room primarily hosted bands that Crowley booked at Max's. The bands that played the smaller street level room, the Map Room, by and large were newer bands that were inspired by 1970s rock and roll.

Thursday, May 25, 2017
Main Room
Gina Harlow & the Cutthroats
Luigi & the Wiseguys
Jimi LaLumia & the Psychotic Frogs
Deborah Frost
The Waldos
Sic F*cks
The Stilettos
New York Junk
Dive Bar Romeos featuring Joey Kelly
Puma Perl & Friends
The Nihilistics

The Map Room
The Rebel Saints
The Brunettes
The Cynz
Love Pirates

The Sweet Things
Peter Crowley
Gass Wilde of Love Pirates
Joe Sztabnik & Cynthia Ross of New York Junk
Elda Stiletto with Steve Conte
Cyndi Dawson and Henry Seiz of the Cynz
Russell Wolinsky of Sic F*cks with Alice Cooper's Dennis Dunaway
The Brunettes
Walter Lure of the Waldos
The Rebel Saints
Jimi LaLumia



Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Kevin Morby at the Bowery Ballroom

Kevin Morby learned to play guitar at age 10 and formed his first band, Creepy Aliens, while in his teens in his native Kansas City, Kansas. In the mid-2000s, at age 18, he took a train to New York City, where he supported himself by working bike delivery and café jobs and joined the noise-folk group Woods on bass. While living in Brooklyn, he became close friends and roommates with Cassie Ramone of the punk trio Vivian Girls, and the two formed an indie-rock side project together called The Babies, releasing albums in 2011 and 2012. In 2013, Morby relocated to Los Angeles, California, where he played in the Complete Last Waltz, a tribute group playing the music of the Band. Morby began a solo career in 2013. Morby's  fourth album, City Music, will be released on June 16, 2017.

At the Bowery Ballroom tonight, Kevin Morby recalled when he performed at the venue as an opening act 10 years earlier, vowing to return as a headliner. For this occasion, Morby wore a flashy Nudie-styled white suit emblazoned with large black musical notes and with his initials studded on the lapels and the words City Music studded on the tail of the jacket. Accompanied by guitarist Meg Duffy, bassist Cyrus Gengras, and drummer Nick Kinsey, Morby sang a series of love songs to the city, beginning with "City Music." Together, they tethered sparse arrangements for an enchanting, almost hypnotic indie-folk sound. Opener John Andrews joined on a saw on the song "Singing Saw." Midway through the set, Morby performed a few songs solo, including the non-LP single "Beautiful Strangers," which he dedicated to Manchester, England. The set was soft in tone and poignant in depth, with Morby singing in talky Bob Dylan phrasings and a Lou Reed attitude. It was no wonder that he concluded his set with covers of both artists, the Velvet Underground's "Rock and Roll" and Dylan's "Tonight I'll Be Staying Here with You." For that last song, coincidentally sung on Dylan's birthday, Morby welcomed Sam Cohen of the Brooklyn band Apollo Sunshine on guitar.

Visit Kevin Morby at www.kevinmorby.com.

Tuesday, May 23, 2017

Flogging Molly at Irving Plaza

Dave King
Dave King was born in Dublin, Ireland, and first came to the international public light in the 1980s as the vocalist of the heavy metal band Fastway, a supergroup that included guitarist "Fast" Eddie Clarke of Motörhead and bassist Pete Way of UFO. He later fronted a hard rock band called Katmandu, featuring Mandy Meyer of Krokus on guitars. After relocating to Los Angles, California, King and violinist Bridget Regan in 1993 assembled a rock band with a Celtic feel, performing a mix of traditional Irish music and rock weekly at an Irish pub called Molly Malone's. They named the band Flogging Molly after that bar, feeling that by playing there every Monday night they were "flogging it to death," according to King. The band presently consists of King, Regan, guitarist Dennis Casey, accordion player Matt Hensley, mandolin player Bob Schmidt, bassist Nathen Maxwell and drummer Mike Alonso. Flogging Molly's sixth studio album, Life Is Good, will be released on June 2, 2017.

Headlining the first of two nights at Irving Plaza tonight, Flogging Molly lived up to its reputation as a boisterous Celtic punk septet. Irish-sounding melodies were embellished with a violin, an accordion, a tin whistle and a banjo, but the music was too crushing to be confused with Irish jigs. The lyrics touched on the good and bad of Irish history, politics, love, death and the culture of poverty and pubs. Even when singing about a negative subject, the songs were packaged in rousing hope and passion. The concert was a rollicking celebration of life as we know it, but with a Celtic lilt.

Visit Flogging Molly at www.floggingmolly.com.

Setlist
  1. Selfish Man
  2. The Hand of John L. Sullivan
  3. Swagger
  4. Drunken Lullabies
  5. The Worst Day Since Yesterday
  6. Requiem for a Dying Song
  7. Saints & Sinners
  8. Life in a Tenement Square
  9. Float
  10. Tobacco Island
  11. Laura
  12. Reptiles (We Woke Up)
  13. Rebels of the Sacred Heart
  14. Devil's Dance Floor
  15. Guns of Jericho
  16. What's Left of the Flag
  17. The Seven Deadly Sins
Encore:
  1. Crushed (Hostile Nations)
  2. If I Ever Leave This World Alive
  3. Always Look on the Bright Side of Life (Monty Python cover)

Saturday, May 20, 2017

Stimulate at Dröm

Since 1996, New York-based Xris SMack! has developed a cultic following by mixing gothic and fetish lifestyles in nightclubs and concert halls. Onstage, there might be a techno industrial band pumping out hard and heavy synth beats. On the side of the stage or on the floor in front of the stage, women in latex, rubber or studded leather outfits dance provocatively. At one corner there may be an illuminated whipping post for those who might like to participate in flagellation. Under his blue dreads, the ever-charming SMack! can be found at the edge of the stage, resetting the fog machines or taking photographs of the musicians; otherwise, he will be out in the audience meeting and greeting his longtime followers and introducing himself to newcomers.

SMack!'s events are more than concerts; they are a gathering spot for a colorful collective of countercultural scene makers. The SMack! series seems to be more fetish oriented and his Stimulate series may be more music-rooted. He also collaborates with Vampire Freaks and other similar promoters. The thread that runs throughout all these series is that of a new alternative community of vibrant rockers. The events start late and end in the wee hours, but there will not be any sleepers.

SMack! has an acute ear for new underground darkwave bands and a knack for reuniting older bands from the subsurface. At Dröm on May 20, Stimulate presented Dawn of Ashes, Projekt F and Nightmare before Krztoff. Headliner Dawn of Ashes, from Los Angeles, California, is an extreme metal band incorporating a horror image with industrial and melodic black metal compositions. Projekt F in an industrial metal band from Montreal, Canada. Nightmare before Krztoff featured members of Bile and Pigface, who played what the band has described as "electronic audio oddities and alien soundscapes." SMack! manages several websites that announce his various projects, but for information on forthcoming parties, start with a visit to www.stimulate-me.com.

Nightmare before Krztoff
Projekt F
Dawn of Ashes
The whipping post

The Black Cats NYC at Sidewalk

In the early 1990s, vocalist/bassist Andrew Giordano joined lead guitarist Don Sztabnik on the downtown New York City rock club circuit in the Dragons. Some 25 years later, the duo reunited to form the Black Cats NYC. While the band is hinged on Gordano and Sztabnik, the Black Cats NYC presently also includes guitarist Francesco D’Ambrosio, drummer Jason Reddish, and backing vocalists Deanna Lair and Julie M. Smith, also known as the Pussycats. The band is also frequently augmented onstage by pianist Alex Giordano, saxophonist Seaton "Raven" Hancock and vocalist Gass Wild. The Black Cats NYC released a three-song EP entitled Gone on October 28, 2016.

At Sidewalk tonight, the Black Cats NYC brought the roll back to the rock. The Black Cats NYC knew that to lead the party and electrify the spirit, the band had to avoid pensive confessional lyrics and complicated musical arrangements. Instead, the band played light-hearted rave-ups with stinging guitar leads and sax breaks separating the verses and big harmonies on the choruses. Throwback moments were inspired by the core of 1950s rock, 1960s pop and 1970s glam rock. Raucous songs like "Animal" and "She Got What I Need" charged with dirty grooves, with Giordano's strong vocals raising the temperature of the room. This was several steps beyond garage rock, yet still a bit raw and dirty. It would be hard for a rock and roll fan not to enjoy the Black Cats NYC live.

The Black Cats NYC will host a video release party for "Too Far Gone" at the Delancey on June 15. In the meantime, visit the Black Cats NYC at www.theblackcatsnyc.com.

Setlist
  1. Storm Before The Calm
  2. She Got What I Need
  3. Big Bomb Baby
  4. Help from Above
  5. Psychotic Whisper
  6. All in Love with Me
  7. Candy Ass
  8. Walk You Home
  9. Animal
  10. Blame it on Mom
  11. Too Far Gone

Friday, May 19, 2017

Joey Ramone Birthday Bash at the Studio at Webster Hall

Joey Ramone was the iconic lead singer for the leading American punk band, the Ramones, from its origin in 1974 to the band's demise in 1996. When the band split, he launched a solo career, but then succumbed to lymphatic cancer one month before his 50th birthday in 2001.

Before his death, Ramone had planned a birthday concert featuring musician friends and colleagues. He committed his brother, Mickey Leigh, to make it happen even if the celebrant did not survive that long. Leigh continues to curate a Joey Ramone Birthday Bash annually on his brother's birthday, May 19. This year the all-star concert was held at the Studio at Webster Hall once again.

This year's Birthday Bash highlighted Leave Home and Rocket to Russia, two Ramones albums that turned 40 this year. The bill featured the Love Triangle, comprised of Leigh on vocals and guitar, and former Ramones bassist CJ Ramone and drummer Richie Ramone. Leigh also closed the evening with three songs from Joey Ramone's two solo albums. The centerpiece of the evening, however, featured a house band comprised of various vocalists plus Ramones' engineer/producer Ed Stasium and Walt Stack (the Bullys) on guitar, Andy Shernoff (the Dictators) on bass, and Clem Burke (Blondie) and Richie Ramone on drums. (Trivia: Burke was Elvis Ramone for two gigs in 1987.) The main segment of the concert saw many of the singers from the original local punk scene return to the punk stage. Evil Presly (the Independents), Russell Wolinsky, Tish and Snooky Bellomo (Sic F*cks), Miriam Linna (the Cramps, Nervus Rex), Tim Heap (Heap), Ingrid Larsen (Ingrid & the Defectors), Lindsey Anderson (Kitty & the Kowalskis), Rew Starr, Phil Marcade (the Senders), James Boland (television's Vinyl), Mick Stitch (L.E.S. Stitches), Dave Ellis, Jahn Xavier (the Nitecaps), George Tabb (Furious George), Pat DiNizio (the Smithereens), and Mickey Leigh each sang one or two songs from the featured albums.

David Peel, who regularly performed at these bashes and died on April 6, was honored by his sidemen and members of the Accelerators. The Cuts and L.E.S. Stitches also performed their own sets. Punk Magazine's John Holmstrom, Pete Aschner, Debra "Raffles" Trizzini, and former Ramones road manager Monte A. Melnick were among the hosts.

All proceeds from the concert contributed to lymphoma research in memory of Joey Ramone. Further donations may be contributed to the Joey Ramone Foundation for Lymphoma Research at P.O. Box 1107, Cooper Station, New York, NY 10276.

Setlists

The Love Triangle
with Mickey Leigh on vocals and guitar, CJ Ramone on bass and Richie Ramone on drums
  1. Do You Wanna Dance (Bobby Freeman cover)
  2. Locket Love
  3. I Can't Give You Anything
  4. Suzy Is a Headbanger
  5. We're a Happy Family
Leave Home/Rocket to Russia
with Ed Stasium and Walt Stack on guitars, Andy Shernoff on bass, and Clem Burke (first five songs) and Richie Ramone (last 15 songs) on drums.
  1. Glad to See You Go (Evil Presly, vocals)
  2. Gimme Gimme Shock Treatment (Russell Wolinsky, Tish & Snooky Bellomo, vocals)
  3. I Remember You - (Miriam Linna, vocals)
  4. Oh Oh I Love Her So - (Tim Heap, vocals)
  5. Carbona Not Glue (Ingrid Larsen, vocals)
  6. You're Gonna Kill That Girl (Lindsey Anderson, Rew Starr, vocals)
  7. Commando (Philippe Marcade, Lindsey Anderson, Rew Starr, vocals)
  8. I Don't Care (James Boland, vocals)
  9. Here Today, Gone Tomorrow (James Boland, vocals)
  10. Babysitter (Mick Stitch, vocals)
  11. Ramona (Dave Ellis, vocals)
  12. Swallow My Pride (Jahn Xavier, vocals)
  13. I Wanna Be Well (George Tabb, vocals)
  14. Sheena Is a Punk Rocker (Pat Dinizio, vocals)
  15. Rockaway Beach (Mickey Leigh, vocals)
  16. California Sun (Joe Jones cover) (James Boland & Miriam Linna, vocals)
  17. Surfin' Bird (The Trashmen cover) (Russell Wolinsky, Tish & Snooky Bellomo , vocals)
  18. Cretin Hop (Mick Stitch, vocals)
  19. Teenage Lobotomy (Evil Presly, vocals)
  20. Pinhead (George Tabb, vocals)
Tribute to Joey Ramone
with Walt Stack and Matt Chiaravalle on guitars, David Merrill (the Rattlers) on bass, Pat Carpenter on drums, and Arno Hecht (the Uptown Horns) on saxophone
  1. Sweet Joey (Andy Shernoff cover) (Andy Shernoff, vocals)
  2. New York City (Joey Ramone cover) (Mickey Leigh, vocals)
  3. Waiting for that Railroad (Joey Ramone cover) (Mickey Leigh, vocals)
  4. What a Wonderful World (Louis Armstrong cover) (Mickey Leigh, vocals)
Mickey Leigh
John Holmstrom
Ed Stasium
Walt Stack
Andy Shernoff
Clem Burke
Evil Presly
Russel Wolinsky, Tish & Snooky Bellomo
Miriam Linna
Tim Heap
Ingrid Pedersen
Richie Ramone
Rew Starr & Lindsey Anderson
Phil Marcade
James Boland
Mick Stitch
Dave Ellis
Jahn Xavier
Arno Hecht
George Tabb
Pat DiNizio
James Boland & Miriam Linna